Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Interview on Moody's Prime Time America

Paul Butler of Moody Radio's Prime Time America interviewed me today on my favorite subject: the gospel. Paul read an article I wrote entitled, "A Message Worth Fighting For," that appears in the February issue of TableTalk and thought it might be helpful to discuss the simplicity of the gospel on the program.

It is slated to air at 5:20 Easter Time on Moody Radio stations. An mp3 will be available later. I will provide a link once it is accessible. EDIT: Here is the link to the mp3.

6 comments:

Orang Putih said...

Tom, how can I email you? I really would like to ask you a question. I'm a pastor in TN that really needs help.

Tom said...

You may contact me here.

Gordan said...

Tom, I really appreciated the point you made about the Gospel not merely being the entrance to eternal life, but the only way of life now. We don't "move on" or mature away from the Gospel. We finish the same way we began: by the hearing with faith. Praise God.

irreverend fox said...

Brother Tom,

Can you confirm Wade Burlesons report regarding the targeted firing of 5 pointers at SWBTS?

Tom said...

IF:

I cannot.

ta

child of grace said...

I can:



"Southwestern will not build a school in the future around anybody who could not look anybody in the world in the eyes and say, "Christ died for your sins."

Paige Patterson, SWBTS President, as tape recorded by SBC Today at their “Baptist Identity” blog on February 5, 2009



“A consistent five-point Calvinist cannot look a congregation in the eyes or even a single sinner in the eye and say: “Christ died for you.” What they have to say to be consistent with their own theology is “Christ died for sinners.” Since Christ did not die for the non-elect, and since the five-point Calvinist does not know who the elect are, it is simply not possible in a preaching or witnessing situation to say to them directly “Christ died for you.”

Dr. David Allen, Dean, SWBTS School of Theology at BaptistTheology.org / SWBTS Center for Theological Research, November 2008