Thursday, February 15, 2007

Notes from the Baptist Identity Conference, pt. 1

Already the trip to Jackson, TN and Union University has been worth the expense, time and effort because of renewed fellowship with old friends and the opportunity to make new friends. I finally met Timmy Brister in person, and was allowed to share a table with him, Steve McCoy and Joe Thorn.

I enjoyed renewing friendship with Ben Cole, Art Rogers, Steve Weaver, C.B. Scott, Ray Van Neste, Greg Thornbury, David Dockery and others. Some of these brothers will be live-blogging, or at least blogging about the sessions. I won't attempt that, but I will try to give some updates as I have time.

Parts of the conference will be live-streamed by a local TV station.

Frank Page spoke on the "Future of the Cooperative Program." He is the President of the SBC as well as serving as Pastor to the FBC of Taylors, SC and the self-described, "Southern Baptist Forrest Gump." :-) Using Philippians 1:12-20, Dr. Page called attention to 3 points from Paul's words that apply to Southern Baptists and the Cooperative Program.

1. The issue of mindset, v. 14
2. The issue of motives, vv. 15-19
3. The issue of methodology

I like Dr. Page. His spirit is so gracious and he comes across as a man committed to real humility. He is not willing to paper over the problems and differences in the SBC. He acknowledges the need for healthy debate and wants too encourage it. Dr. Page entertained questions after his talk and I found this to be the most helpful part of his presentation. If everyone interested the health of the SBC would imbibe his spirit, the kind of important, difficult dialogue that needs to take place across our convention could be greatly facilitated.

4 comments:

art rogers said...

Didn't you think he sounded quite reformed when he was talking about suffering?

What was that "Trouble With TULIP" thing all about? ;^)

Tom said...

Art:

Very astute observation. :-) Don't you appreciate Dr. Page's spirit?

Great to see you!

Chris Bonts said...

Thanks for the note about Frank Page's irenicism and graciousness. These are qualities that have been sorely missing in portions of the blogosphere the past few weeks.

Chris Bonts

Douglas said...

The church is not in a healthy state because many in the visible are not "born again."

Sir,

why does Dr. Page have and allow Rick Warren's false teachings at Taylors First Baptist Church, Kensington Apartments Ministry?

Dr. Frank Page

Kensington Apartments Ministry

Men’s Bible Study
Every Monday night at 7:00 pm- The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren, led by Bo Davies, assisted by Tim Landreth and Bill Kennedy.

We have a core group of men who are faithful in attending and eager to listen and participate in discussions. Praise the Lord for men who are willing to share and learn from each other as they discover God's Purpose for their life.


Is not the "Purpose Driven Life" teaching bringing much deception and downgrade of sound doctrine into the church? I think it does. Does it not contain a watered down gospel? I think it does. Does it not contain twisting of Scripture? I think it does.

After listening to this 15-part audio on the "Purpose Driven Movemment" I think there is a very serious problem in the church:

Redefining Christianity Radio Broadcasts
Based on Bob DeWaay's book, Redefining Christianity - Understanding the Purpose Driven Movement

"Have we lost the Gospel?"

You wrote a post titled as above and many have lost the gospel because of teachers like Rick Warren who do not preach and teach the true gospel. Not only is the SBC affected by Rick Warren's false teachings, the church of all denominations, world wide, is as well! That is tragic. It will take years and years to undo the damage Rick Warren's "Purpose Driven Life" teaching has done.

R. C. Sproul was once asked; 'As a Christian educator, what are some of your frustrations in your efforts to teach the Word?'

"I have lot's of frustrations about teaching. But I would say my greatest frustration is that there is a tremendous anti-intellectual spirit present in contemporary Christendom. It's extremely hard to educate people who are opposed to using their minds. How else can we get educated?

There are reasons for this attitude. Evangelical Christians, for example, have seen a wholesale attack upon the sacred things that they believe and live by -- the Bible and all the rest -- by colleges and universities, by professors and theologians. They've come to distrust serious education. They want to keep their faith simple lest it be open to some kind of criticism or attack. I hear it constantly. "You have to take it on faith," as if seeking to understand something were evil. And how many times have you heard people say that they want to have childlike thinking?

What the Bible says, however, is that we are to be "babes in evil," that we are to be like children in terms of being not sophisticated in our capacity for sin. But in understanding we are to be full-grown and mature. We are to put away childish things. I am very frustrated with the resistance I encounter in the Christian community against in-depth study of the things of God.

My second great frustration is that so many Christians, in order to truly learn the things of God, first have to unlearn what they've already learned. It's not by accident that the greatest threat to the integrity of Old Testament Israel and to the safety of the nation was not the opposing nations like the Philistines and the Babylonians but the enemy within -- the false prophet. And the false prophet seduced the people away from the truth of God. Now that happens today, and it happens on both sides of the camp -- the liberals and conservatives. And so what happens is people are educated with teaching that is not sound, and that's frustrating.
Pages 100-101
"Now That's A Good Question"