Tuesday, October 11, 2005

Lewis and Carson on worship

C.S. Lewis offers helpful insights on worship in his Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer. In the first letter he complains about the unhelpful innovations in worship that "new, keen vicar[s]" too often introduce in an established church's corporate worship. "It looks," he writes, "as if they believed people can be lured to go to church by incessant brightenings, lightenings, lengthenings, abridgements, simplifications, and complications of the service" (p. 4).

Such an approach, he argues, is a distraction from worship.
"Novelty, simply as such, can have only an entertainment value. And they [worshipers] don't go to church to be entertained. They go to use the service, or, if you prefer, to enact it. Every service is a structure of acts and words through which we receive a sacrament, or repent, or supplicate, or adore. And it enables us to do these things best--if you like, it "works" best--when, through long familiarity, we don't have to think about it. As long as you notice, and have to count, the steps, you are not dancing but only learning to dance. A good shoe is a shoe you don't notice. Good reading becomes possible when you need not consciously think about eyes, or light, or print, or spelling. The perfect church service would be one we were almost unaware of; our attention would have been on God.

But every novelty prevents this. It fixes our attention on the service itself; and thinking about worship is a different thing from worshipping....

A still worse thing may happen. Novelty may fix our attention not even on the service but on the celbrant. You know what I mean. Try as one may to exclude it, the question, 'What on earth is he up to now?' will intrude. It lays one's devotion waste. There is really some excuse for the man who said, 'I wish they'd remember that the charge to Peter was Feed my sheep; not Try experiments on my rats, or even, Teach my performing dogs new tricks'" (pp. 4-5).


This point is similarly made by D.A. Carson in Worship by the Book (pp. 30-31):

"In an age increasingly suspicious of (linear) thought, there is much more respect for the 'feelings' of things--whether a film or a church service. It is disturbingly easy to plot surveys of people, especially young people, drifting from a church of excellent preaching and teaching to one with excellent music because, it is alleged, there is 'better worship' there. But we need to think carefully about this matter. Let us restrict ourselves for the moment to corporate worship. Although there are things that can be done to enhance corporate worship, there is a profound sense in which excellent worship cannot be attained merely by pursuing excellent worship. In the same way that, according to Jesus, you cannot find yourself until you lose yourself, so also you cannot find excellent corporate worship until you stop trying to find excellent corporate worship and pursue God himself. Despite the protestations, one sometimes wonders if we are beginning to worship worship rather than worship God. As a brother put it to me, it's a bit like those who begin by admiring the sunset and soon begin to admire themselves admiring the sunset."


If we focus more on God than on worship we will worship God more and better.

2 comments:

Stephen A Morse said...

I had a discussion with a family last night. They visited our church last Sunday and are looking for a church home. I asked about their prior church experience and immediately I was drawn into a discussion on 'traditional' or 'contemporary' 'styles'. What an albatross around the neck of Southern Baptists across this country. That we are known more for our 'style' than our doctrines and that we are raising a generation of individuals who would rather die fighting over 'style' that over the 'sola's'.
God help us!

Brian Hamrick said...

Amen Stephen! Amen Tom!